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The Benefits of Biking Your Daily Commute

In recent years, there’s been a rise in the number of commuters who opt to leave their cars at home and bike to work. In Spring of 2014, it was estimated that the number of people who have been cycling within the last year was as high as 67.3 million, and there are currently 9 million bike trips in the U.S. daily.

It’s Cheaper
While gas prices may be lower than they have been in recent years, a full tank of gas can still cost you a lot of money. And with the daily back and forth from your job, you could have to fill up once every week. Bikes, on the other hand, do not need any fueling. A recent study found that if Americans took one four-mile round-trip commute to work by bike instead of car each week, we’d burn nearly 2 billion fewer gallons of gas annually.

It’s Good For Your Health
Every adult should have at least 30 minutes of exercise each day. But your work schedule can often make it difficult to find time for the gym. A 15 minute bike to work and back can easily provide you with the right amount of activity to keep you healthy. In addition, biking to work every day will result in better blood pressure, sleeping better, and you will likely have an increased self-confidence level.

There’s No Traffic
Nothing is worse than getting stuck in traffic. The average American spends more than 25 minutes on their daily commute, which can take twice as long if traffic conditions are bad. Biking to work will help you skip the morning traffic jam, and will get you to work on time, every time. Biking is also a great solution for a lack of parking, as a bike can be stored just about anywhere.

If you’re looking to start your biking commute, visit your local bike shop and look for lightweight road bikes, or other hybrid bikes that will work for your needs. Or, look online or in the newspaper for used bikes for sale. Shopping for used bikes is just like shopping for a used car, so you should always make sure you are able to see the bike before you make the purchase.

Peter Lieberman

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16 Sep, 2015

Cycling

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